Fee Schedule

At J. Brett Miller Law, our fee arrangements include:

  • Fixed Fees for Living Trusts, Wills and all other related documents (starts at $1,500 for a basic Estate Planning Package).
  • Hourly fee of $300 per hour for legal work or representation.
  • No charge to new clients for an initial one hour consultation.

We work with you to keep the cost of handling your matter to a minimum consistent with your objectives.  

 

How long does it take to complete a living trust?

A living trust can typically be completed within two weeks after the initial consultation. At an initial meeting, your individual situation and goals are discussed and based on probate and tax laws, we recommend an estate plan which will help accomplish your goals.

Within two weeks after the initial appointment, a final appointment is scheduled where all estate documents are explained, documents are formally executed, and the binder which includes all information on the estate plan is covered in detail. Necessary steps to complete the transfer of assets into the trust are discussed, including use of letters to deliver to institutions where assets are located. Questions which arise are answered during this conference, and additional questions regarding transfer of assets to the trust are included for one month after execution of documents at no charge to you. After the second meeting, you are prepared to proceed with all steps necessary to transfer assets into the trust. The estate plan is then complete.

 

What should I consider before the first meeting?

Prior to the first meeting, it is helpful to think about:

  • Who should be named as the person who would handle paperwork and control your assets if you were unable to do so? (This can be an individual, such as a family member or friend, or could be an institution, such as the trust department of a bank).
  • Who are the beneficiaries who should eventually receive assets? This information would be the same as the plan of distribution which would ordinarily be put in a will.
  • Determine the approximate value of your estate, including all assets such as investments, real estate, personal property, life insurance, IRAs, and pensions. The total value of assets is not required to be disclosed to anyone, but, if you choose to disclose this information, potential probate costs, tax considerations, and other costs or concerns may be analyzed. Exact values are not necessary since valuations change over time anyway, but knowledge of approximate net worth and the types of assets will be helpful.

 

What should I bring to the first meeting?

It is helpful if you bring the following items to the initial meeting or mail them to the law office prior to the initial meeting:

  • A copy of your current will, if you have one, and copies of any other existing estate planning documents.
  • Copies of any deeds to real estate, the most recent property tax statements for real estate, and any documents regarding real estate such as mortgages or anything else restricting use or transfer.
  • Copies of promissory notes or contracts if anyone owes you money.
  • If you own a business, copies of any partnership, buy-sell, or corporate redemption agreements which may be in place.
  • A basic financial statement listing assets and liabilities and showing whose name assets are titled in and beneficiary designations.

 

How long does it take to complete a will?

A simple will  can typically be completed within two weeks after the initial consultation.  At an initial meeting, your individual situation and goals are discussed and based on probate and tax laws, we recommend estate planning steps which will accomplish your goals.

Within two weeks after the initial appointment, you will come back into the office for a second appointment. The second appointment is usually the final appointment necessary to complete the documents and have them formally executed. Questions which arise are answered during this appointment.

 

What to think about before coming in:

It is helpful, if before the meeting, you think about: 

  • Who should be named as the person who would handle paperwork and control your assets if you were unable to do so? (This can be an individual, such as a family member or friend, or could be an institution, such as the trust department of a bank).
  • Who are the beneficiaries who should eventually receive assets? 
  • Determine the approximate value of your estate, including all assets such as investments, real estate, personal property, life insurance, IRAs, and pensions. The total value of assets is not required to be disclosed to anyone, but, if you choose to disclose this information, potential probate costs, tax considerations, and other costs or concerns may be analyzed. Exact values are not necessary since valuations change over time anyway, but knowledge of approximate net worth and the types of assets will be helpful.
To begin your estate planning process, download the "Estate Planning Questionnaire" or email us at Brett@jbrettmillerlaw.com or call 949-200-8211.